Author Topic: All the colors in the Rainbow...but how many of them!  (Read 518 times)

Offline Dresden

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All the colors in the Rainbow...but how many of them!
« on: April 29, 2017, 09:19:37 PM »
okay, soooo, thought to post this in the fancy color Diamond section because its about fancy color diamond of course  ;D

as i slowly get the the point of this post...

so we seem to know that fancy colors are rarer than other diamonds, i would say from my opinion the rarity of colour would go in this order, though i could be wrong, rarest is pure violet, next maybe it would be pure red, then maybe pure purple and so on and so forth

yellow seems to not be all that rare but who does not like a sunny Diamond!

it all has got me wondering how many more fancy color diamonds are out there left to be mined? will we run out soon, will we discover new mines with new deposits - some how i don't think we will discover new colors  ;D


i also got wondering are there diamonds under the sea, as in under the sea floor somewhere or even out of space! obviously i am not scientific or an expert at any of these subjects  ;D


Its all VERY INTERESTING!

Offline oldmancoyote

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Re: All the colors in the Rainbow...but how many of them!
« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2017, 02:23:56 PM »
How many is a good question... to which I think no-one has the answer, other than "a finite amount". Bear in mind that until 1700 diamonds were only known to come from India, then Brazil was added and for nearly 200 years that was it. Then came South Africa, Russia and several other places. It looks like current mines in Australia are getting exhausted - including one of the main sources of pinks (Argyle mine), and we know much of the Earth's surface well enough to make major discoveries relatively unlikely.

This said, there are still areas that are relatively poorly known from a geological point of view - poorly enough that more mines could be found e.g. under ice caps in Greenland and Antarctica, in Siberia or in central Africa.

Re: yellow: it's very common not least because most yellow diamonds are so coloured by the presence of nitrogen, which also helps the growth of the diamond crystal. In other words, it's easier for a large(r) diamond crystal to be (somewhat) yellow than to be perfectly colourless, which makes things like the Cullinan even more unique.

"New colours" is an interesting question: human vision sees whatever colours it sees and it's unlikely to change (except for currently rather extreme scenarios involving bionics), and while one can argue that there are infinite hues even within the Red-Violet spectrum, the human eye/brain ability for discrimination is finite...

I don't see (!) how totally new colours could be found, because the spectrum is already covered: we know of violet, indigo, blue, green, orange, yellow and red diamonds today, but there is a chance that new "never-seen-so-far" hues exist, and there are very good chances that no single human being has ever seen all those that exist: Stephen Hofer's rather monumental (750 pages) reference book about coloured diamonds ("Collecting and Classifying Colored Diamonds") has - as far as I can remember - nothing looking like these two, which were (are) however available to buy through DBL:




Diamonds under the sea floor are unlikely (at least unless we figure out ways of mining directly from the mantle): I think the oldest sea floor is about 200 million years, while most mined diamonds are significantly older than that. On the other hand, diamonds in outer space do exist: they are found (very small ones, so far at least) in meteorites called carbonaceous chondrites, and it is possible that some star nuclei are made almost exclusively of carbon, so once the star has finished its "active life" and blown off its outer layers in a supernova explosion what is left behind is effectively a giant diamond (or maybe a huge Lonsdaleite crystal? I don't think anyone has studied what happens to the crystallography of carbon under such extreme pressure/temperature) Ref: http://www.space.com/26335-coldest-white-dwarf-star-diamond.html