Author Topic: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(  (Read 22214 times)

Offline Debangel

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I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« on: July 03, 2011, 01:05:41 PM »
So, my SIL (who is my BFF) and I got to ditch our collective offspring yesterday, and go to the mall.  Actually, to the Container Store, which I as a Virgo am not allowed to enter unsupervised. (Everything in my home is in its own little basket or container. I have told Da Moose that the only reason he's not in a basket is that I haven't found one big enough to hold him yet.)

Of course, the lure of greasy cheesesteak sammiches was too much, so afterwards we needed to get our rings cleaned, at the only chain jewelry store I would ever consider purchasing from. Rhymes with "Glen Ridge". I used to shop in one of their stores in San Diego, and was happy with their quality and selection. Anyway, a new employee helped us "play" with rings while ours were in their Jacuzzi.  He was about 50, I would guess, so no newbie, suit and tie. He didn't know 1) what a halo setting was 2) that there was more than one kind of pave 3) what three different stones were that were IN HIS CASE- morganite, tsavorite, and Mexican fire opal.  He was very pleasant and polite, but was NOT a good salesperson. Why did he get hired??

Also, I really, really want to go to GIA school now. I wanted to go years ago, when I lived just 8 miles away from the Carlsbad campus, but I let my mother, rest her soul, talk me out of it. Her view was "and what can you do with it?? Sell jewelry???" I'm not sure she quite understood that I like to sell- just in general- enough to do it for free ;)

So..anyone here who can give me the "skinny" on taking some classes? I do need to not work for free, unfortunately, because nannies/starving writers make little enough as it is. Halp?

Offline oldmancoyote

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Re: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2011, 06:00:17 PM »
Only thing I can help with is a container... but you may not like the idea, though it does fit the definition of jewellery.



More seriously, my take on GIA is that it may help but it's not necessary; location and willingness to work are probably more important to begin with. If you want to work as a lapidary or in an auction house, different question...
« Last Edit: July 03, 2011, 06:11:42 PM by oldmancoyote »

Offline saqsay1

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Re: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2011, 07:34:46 PM »
I worked for a major chain jewelry store and I found out that getting a certification from GIA is EXPENSIVE!!! Not sure it is worth it.... I only wish I had worked there long enough to get mine for free... :-\
"If the US government were placed in control of the Sahara Desert, it would run out of sand in 25 years."

Offline Diamondsbylauren

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Re: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2011, 09:51:03 PM »
I hate to say this, but my experience is that GIA classes will not give anyone the suitable tools to work in the most basic of jewelry store positions.
Having never attended a GIA course myself, the only basis for my statement is the result of having hired a bunch of GG's.

The practical side of the jewelry business can only be learned by gaining practical experience.
Even then, different jewelry concerns use drastically different methods and procedures.

I learned how to grade diamonds at Harry Winston.
My next job, at a company called M. Fabrikant and Sons was like a slap in the face- although my grading and diamond handling skills would be essential, almost everything else would be done differently.

That reminds me of another thing GIA does NOT teach it's students. The practical aspects of handling diamonds.
How to examine a diamond with a loupe.
How to use a  diamond tweezer
How to fold a diamond paper.
How to handle smaller diamonds- melee. How to use a diamond scoop
These may sound like simple things but I can usually tell if someone knows what they are doing simply by observing them examine a diamond, or piece of jewelry.

Bottom line: Take the courses - the title is a very good start.
Part of me would lie to take the classes just for the title- however it's never been that pressing a concern.
But the only way to learn the business is to somehow get in a position where you can be involved in it.


Or read Cdi.
:geni:

David
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Offline Debangel

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Re: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2011, 11:40:56 PM »
Sooooo, David..when can I start? I will work for bialys and sparklies on my birthday and Christmas ;)

Offline diamondjunkie

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Re: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2011, 12:43:35 PM »
Hey Debangel,

Well, I used to work for 'Glen Ridge' and I can tell you that they do more to train their employees (including paying for GIA courses once you pass a 6 month probation period) than most mall stores.  Still, everyone has to start somewhere and if you got a real jewelry newbie (sounds like you did!) you may need to cut him some slack.  Retails is retail after all and they don't pay for experts - but he'll soon learn that the commission is better if you are knowledgeable!

You most certainly can learn a lot here.  Maybe next time you are in the mall you could give him CDi's web address- it might help him!

Offline Debangel

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Re: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« Reply #6 on: July 08, 2011, 02:29:53 PM »
Diamondjunkie, you make a very good point!  I always did like that store, and I suppose I was just embarrassed for the associate that he didn't have the knowledge base that I was accustomed to when going to one of their stores.  I ended up looking like a know-it-all in front of him, when what I really wanted was to learn something new from someone who enjoyed being in the field.  I wouldn't be surprised to hear that the poor economy has led to less training and education being offered.

I think giving him CGi's link is a great idea!  I've certainly learned so many interesting things since joining, not the least of which is..there is SO much more to learn!

Offline Sweet Pea

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Re: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« Reply #7 on: October 07, 2011, 08:19:11 PM »
Hi Debangel,

Fwiw, if you should decide to pursue the GIA thing for whatever reason, know that they DO have a distance education option that includes 7 online course offerings, and as such things go, their tuition does not strike me as particularly outrageous.

If you took every distance learning class they offer and bought the "optional" books,  all told it would cost you under $6000.  That's waaay less than I payed for my 2 years of grad. school.    :sultan:

Becoming an Accredited Jewelry Professional (AJP) will only run you about $450 for the eLearning option. http://www.gia.edu/educational-programs/programs/gemology/accredited-jewelry-professional/index.html

They have a monthly payment plan for three of the more expensive courses to make it more affordable, and you can audit any online course for 30 days and get a full refund if not satisfied.

Now, if your goal is to become a Graduate Jeweler or Graduate Gemologist...then, yeah... you have to be "on campus" either in NY or CA, and the tuition starts to get spendy, but no more spendy than any other graduate school program. ($16,500 for GJ and $19,000 for GG).

Now before anyone accuses me of being a GIA shill, that's not where I'm coming from at all.  I'm just someone who went back to grad. school later in life and am up to my eyeballs in student loan debt...and STILL feel it was the BEST decision I ever made because I got so much more value out of my Master's program than whatever I paid in tuition and fees.    (Program was in Mediation and Conflict Studies -- talk about a degree that impacts *every aspect* of your life in a positive way...)

Question:  If you knew you could not fail, what would you do?  What would you change?  What would you try?

The most important thing is that you (in the words of Henry David Thoreau), "Move confidently in the direction of your dreams. Live the life you've imagined!"   :pear2:
"I will put the diamond chain round your neck, and the circlet on your forehead, which it will become: for Nature...has stamped her patent of nobility on this brow, Jane; and I will clasp the bracelets on these fine wrists, and load these fairy-like fingers with rings." ~ Edward Rochester, Jane Eyre

Offline G

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Re: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« Reply #8 on: January 23, 2012, 02:14:16 PM »

Have wanted to work with diamonds and colored stones forever. Checked into the GIA
courses and they DON'T teach grading fancy diamonds at all. HUH - i spoke with one of the
teachers there and have found more useful information at IGS. Am taking a diamond
grading course close to where i live - plus studying the material at IGS and there is ONE
place that does teach more on grading fancy diamonds but the course is only once a year
and not until next November. Of course they tried to talk me into taking a grading diamond
rough course but it does nothing in the area i am interested in. Have already dabbled in
faceting stones etc. My interest is and has been for years in fancies and also jade. So am
finally moving into as much depth as is possible to find through whatever limited courses
there are in this area. GIA said it's such a niche market WHY would you want to do that ?
Are you kidding ? hahahahahahahaha

It's all about the color of life. Take time and reflect in the diamonds.

Offline Diamondsbylauren

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Re: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« Reply #9 on: January 23, 2012, 02:44:21 PM »
I hate to say this, but my experience is that GIA classes will not give anyone the suitable tools to work in the most basic of jewelry store positions.
Having never attended a GIA course myself, the only basis for my statement is the result of having hired a bunch of GG's.

The practical side of the jewelry business can only be learned by gaining practical experience.
Even then, different jewelry concerns use drastically different methods and procedures.

I learned how to grade diamonds at Harry Winston.
My next job, at a company called M. Fabrikant and Sons was like a slap in the face- although my grading and diamond handling skills would be essential, almost everything else would be done differently.

That reminds me of another thing GIA does NOT teach it's students. The practical aspects of handling diamonds.
How to examine a diamond with a loupe.
How to use a  diamond tweezer
How to fold a diamond paper.
How to handle smaller diamonds- melee. How to use a diamond scoop
These may sound like simple things but I can usually tell if someone knows what they are doing simply by observing them examine a diamond, or piece of jewelry.

Bottom line: Take the courses - the title is a very good start.
Part of me would lie to take the classes just for the title- however it's never been that pressing a concern.
But the only way to learn the business is to somehow get in a position where you can be involved in it.


Or read Cdi.
:geni:



See above....good luck on learning fancy colors- that's a tough one for people who've been in the trade for many years.
It's all ( and ONLY) about experience.
David
Check out our YouTube Channel

Offline firegypsy

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Re: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« Reply #10 on: January 23, 2012, 03:04:26 PM »
I hate to say this, but my experience is that GIA classes will not give anyone the suitable tools to work in the most basic of jewelry store positions.
Having never attended a GIA course myself, the only basis for my statement is the result of having hired a bunch of GG's.

The practical side of the jewelry business can only be learned by gaining practical experience.
Even then, different jewelry concerns use drastically different methods and procedures.

I learned how to grade diamonds at Harry Winston.
My next job, at a company called M. Fabrikant and Sons was like a slap in the face- although my grading and diamond handling skills would be essential, almost everything else would be done differently.

That reminds me of another thing GIA does NOT teach it's students. The practical aspects of handling diamonds.
How to examine a diamond with a loupe.
How to use a  diamond tweezer
How to fold a diamond paper.
How to handle smaller diamonds- melee. How to use a diamond scoop
These may sound like simple things but I can usually tell if someone knows what they are doing simply by observing them examine a diamond, or piece of jewelry.

Bottom line: Take the courses - the title is a very good start.
Part of me would lie to take the classes just for the title- however it's never been that pressing a concern.
But the only way to learn the business is to somehow get in a position where you can be involved in it.


Or read Cdi.
:geni:



See above....good luck on learning fancy colors- that's a tough one for people who've been in the trade for many years.
It's all ( and ONLY) about experience.

at my interview this week I'm going to bust this out.  "One of the people I respect most in the diamond field says that way to learn the business is to somehow get in a position where you can be involved in it."

Really, it's true for MOST industries, but quite relevant (and timely!) here!

Offline lovecolor

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Re: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« Reply #11 on: January 23, 2012, 03:19:11 PM »
You go for it firegypsy!  Show them what you got...and put that fire where it will help you shine!    :gogirl5:     :-*
« Last Edit: January 23, 2012, 03:20:40 PM by lovecolor »

Offline Trinkette

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Re: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« Reply #12 on: January 23, 2012, 03:40:07 PM »
We've gone round and round here before about the value of a GIA education (or similar). I don't think this is different than any other field one might study in preparation for a career or serious hobby. After all, just because one goes to law school, or medical school, or business school, or art school or any other school/university intended for specialized study, it does not mean that upon graduation one is an expert, or really, even remotely talented at one's chosen field study. It does, however, provide a good starting point, as well as opportunities and access to a chosen field. What one does with the education after that is open to interpretation...

I don't think anyone will disagree that in any specialized field, there is no substitute for experience and great mentors.

Offline lovecolor

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Re: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« Reply #13 on: January 23, 2012, 03:50:47 PM »
We've gone round and round here before about the value of a GIA education (or similar). I don't think this is different than any other field one might study in preparation for a career or serious hobby. After all, just because one goes to law school, or medical school, or business school, or art school or any other school/university intended for specialized study, it does not mean that upon graduation one is an expert, or really, even remotely talented at one's chosen field study. It does, however, provide a good starting point, as well as opportunities and access to a chosen field. What one does with the education after that is open to interpretation...

I don't think anyone will disagree that in any specialized field, there is no substitute for experience and great mentors.

I do agree Trinkette, it's called seasoning...and you can only begin to get that with experience and time...

Offline firegypsy

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Re: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« Reply #14 on: January 23, 2012, 04:12:58 PM »
Absolutely.  And just about all education is valuable regardless, even if it's simply a foundation that has no practical application.

That said, given that I'm interviewing for a job that I'm 100% not qualified for, would never have applied for and for which I possess no credentialing I'm going to steal that line!

And thanks, Lovecolor!   :)
« Last Edit: January 23, 2012, 04:13:29 PM by firegypsy »

Offline Diamondsbylauren

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Re: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« Reply #15 on: January 23, 2012, 04:59:54 PM »
We've gone round and round here before about the value of a GIA education (or similar). I don't think this is different than any other field one might study in preparation for a career or serious hobby. After all, just because one goes to law school, or medical school, or business school, or art school or any other school/university intended for specialized study, it does not mean that upon graduation one is an expert, or really, even remotely talented at one's chosen field study. It does, however, provide a good starting point, as well as opportunities and access to a chosen field. What one does with the education after that is open to interpretation...

I don't think anyone will disagree that in any specialized field, there is no substitute for experience and great mentors.

I have found that few industries, or pursuits can really be accurately related to this aspect of the discussion.
Songwriting, maybe.
You can take as many songwriting courses as you want, it may not help.
John Lennon likely never took a course.

One of the things so lacking on a GIA course is aptitude testing prior to enrollment.
If there was some sort of filter about who gets in, the output would be far more meaningful.
Plus, you'd have a lot less disappointed grads.
Just look at the news, this is by no means limited to GIA- but institutions of higher learning need to do a far better job of disclosing facts that will lead to realistic expectations.
If applicants understand the limited possibilities, they may take a different direction.
If they've worked in a jewelry store for a while ( for example) the course may be far more valuable.
I should also keep in mind who's reading this.
If one of our regulars too the GIA course, they would have a far better frame of reference, as well as a great place to "vet" information they've learned.
David
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Offline Trinkette

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Re: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« Reply #16 on: January 23, 2012, 07:34:00 PM »
OMG. I did it AGAIN. I hit the wrong key and *POOF* went my post!!!!!!

You lucky dog, you, D!  ;)

Offline Trinkette

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Re: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« Reply #17 on: January 23, 2012, 08:44:35 PM »
I was saying...

I don't disagree with you, D. And, I appreciate, respect and understand the exclusive nature of the gem and jewelry trade, especially the diamond industry. It is a trade based upon tradition, trust, technical expertise, apprenticeship, knowledge, respect, and personal contacts. Not just anyone can get in the door. And, not just anyone deserves to get in the door.

And, I wrote a whole lot more, but, there is too much to remember...


However, if you don't happen to live near NYC's diamond district, or Antwerp or Bangkok, you have to be creative about finding ways to learn more about diamonds, colored gems and jewelry. I suppose, if your interest is gems, you could study geology, and get out in the field or work in the lab. But, then, you wouldn't learn much about Boucheron, Bulgari, VC&A or DBL. And if you wanted to learn about jewelry, you could get a job in a mass-market jewelery store or maybe a small boutique shop, but then, you might not ever learn much about pleochroism, horsetail inclusions in gemstones, or even a stone like larimar.

My point is, for the average person not living in or near a gem/jewelry epicenter, you have to be open to lots of different ways to increase gem and jewelry knowledge. Research on the internet. Use the library and the book store. Contact professors. Take community classes. Take online classes. Seek out people in the trade willing to mentor. Make friends. Go to trade shows and clubs. And, if you can get a job at a jewelry store, then, fine. However, most likely, the store will not have the depth, variety or numbers of stock, staff, or even clients, to teach you a whole lot about gems and jewelry after the first week or so.

As PART of the overall learning process, there is GIA, an institution that offers a broad range of information about gems and jewelry. Certainly, it is not the be-all, end-all, but it is a reasonable place to start. If you can't work on 47th street, and you love gems and jewelry... then, why not go for some classes at GIA? The more knowledge you can get your hands on, the better, I say.

As far as expectations go, I am sorry, D, you've run into a pile of gemlogist/jeweler wannabes from GIA. Like any other academic organization, I am sure that there is a small number of exceptional grads, and a whole mess of not-sos. And of course, there are oodles of people in the trade who never needed or wanted to participate in the GIA and they are true talents and experts in the industry.

The reality is, GIA offers classes as a way to fund itself and promote the industry, and they are happy to take anyone's money. And, while they "educate" the masses, a group of really smart, experienced, dedicated GIA scientists do/learn really cool stuff in the lab and in the field. And, the cool guys and gals share their information with us. Of course, in the end, let's face it, GIA exists to promote gems. Period. And, now, it has become an important component in the process of authenticating gems... an unfortunate, but necessary, part of the economics of gems and jewelry. It is what it is.

This is (a shortened  ::) ) LONG post saying, if I were a total gem/jewelry junkie, I'd be snarfing-up all the gem and jewelry info that I could get my hands on, through ALL the sources available to me, including GIA. And each source for information is valuable in its own way. However, I would not value the GIA experience over any other; especially, for example, a good friend taking time out of a crakin' busy day to offer his knowledge, passion and his workplace to me, as he regularly shares his hard-earned expertise to so many over the internet.  :-*


Offline Trinkette

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Re: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« Reply #18 on: January 23, 2012, 08:47:45 PM »
 :faintthud:

Offline Diamondsbylauren

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Re: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« Reply #19 on: January 23, 2012, 09:55:05 PM »
I need to get you a new computer with a CTLZ button that undoes poofs......


That was a great post T- you make excellent points.
If someone wants to learn, they have to start someplace.
I don't know what GIA promotional stuff promises- maybe they're not promoting it as an easy way to get a job.
If someone is not looking to make a living at it- then it's a great thing to do, I agree, why not. If one can afford it.
David
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Offline Trinkette

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Re: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« Reply #20 on: January 24, 2012, 07:49:45 AM »
That's it... that's exactly what I need, a CLTZ button to undo all my mistakes! Do you think there is one for life?

Offline Trinkette

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Re: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« Reply #21 on: January 24, 2012, 08:43:09 AM »
Several years ago, on another forum, someone posted how happy and excited she was because she spent the weekend taking and passing three GIA online classes that gave her the moniker of GIA Accredited Jewelry Professional. Immediately, the woman was hammered by more than one forum member for how "worthlesss" her efforts and the AJP title was. If I remember correctly, one of the most vocal of the posters was another woman who commented how silly the AJP certificate is (each class ends with an "open book" exam), and if one really wanted to be taken seriously, one needed to earn nothing less than the Graduate Gemologist diploma from GIA... like she had done.

I was horrified that so many people, people who didn't even know the OP, could be so judgmental and negative regarding a person's desire to LEARN more about something for which she had interest and felt PASSION. OTOH, having gone through the AJP classes, I might argue the value of blasting through the material in just one weekend.

In the classes, there is a lot of basic material that the poster already may have known, as one might expect from a "regular" on a jewelry forum. And, there is a lot of information pertaining to classic sales methods (YAWN, if you are not taking the classes to improve your jewelry retail skills). Let's face it, these are intro, survey-type courses designed for people who may know nothing about gems or jewelry before taking the courses. So, I would not expect to go from 0 to 60, so to speak, in an intro online course of any kind. However, I do think there is enough, varied "new" material and resources presented in each of the three courses so that one can spend considerably more time than a weekend actually studying and LEARNING the material. After all, isn't that the idea?

Which brings us back to expectations. I think that for some people, having a title equals respect. That is all they need to feel they've done "enough." For others, a title, whether it be AJP or GG, is just a symbol of past presented and processed information. These people recognize that respect is earned through experience, display of knowledge, and the constant pursuit of MORE information... whether or not one has a title is immaterial.

Offline G

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Re: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« Reply #22 on: January 24, 2012, 09:47:14 AM »

 Am doing all possible to learn as much as i can in this field. Who knows where it
will go. Am lucky enough to be able to attend the up coming february show in Miami
where there are tons and tons of Diamonds galore are there to be admired. Am happy
to simply be able to engage in the jewelry trade in some shape and manner. At this point
it is more just like a consultant in helping someone i know pick out jewelry items that
get sold in germany.

Was surprised to find out just how vigilant one has to be when dealing with those selling
diamonds etc. as not all are forthcoming about what they are selling at the diamond
exchanges. One simply cannot have to much knowledge, and with lab grown diamonds
and so many diamond treating procedures hitting the scene - it's important to be able to
be able to discern the differences or to have a place to come where you know things are
presented in an honest manner. It is always a learning experience. Had my first go round
in New York and it was an eye opener.

i Really wanted to go to GIA UNTIL i found out they don't really teach grading
colored diamonds ---- so am still out pursuing the best way to continue to
deepen knowledge. Onwards and upwards. Have been scouring the net to
see what is out there in the way of diamonds and DBL has consistently nice
pieces and inventory. Am immersing myself in as many ways possible in seeing
and learning about and sussing out as much as possible. One thing i did glean
recently was how they get the primary color in grading the diamonds as some
that are graded primary orange or pink base etc. at first glance appear to be
what is determined to be the secondary color. This was a really good thing to
learn. Am loving every moment of this.

Was also surprised to hear that GIA's courses are more geared to selling
jewelry in a store type of thing. Such a surprise.

 :heart2:



It's all about the color of life. Take time and reflect in the diamonds.

Offline ah2bqat

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Re: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« Reply #23 on: January 24, 2012, 12:43:07 PM »
That's it... that's exactly what I need, a CLTZ button to undo all my mistakes! Do you think there is one for life?

Don't I wish!  But truly, T, you can use the Ctrl-z combo to bring back what was immediately lost, or click your edit button at the way top of your screen and 'Undo' (same-same as control-z, only you don't have to remember the combo).

Really, just wanted to tell you how much I agree with your assessment on formal education via institution, and that which comes through other sources, frequently with greater talent and passion for the subject.

The alphabet soup can get your foot in the door, but talent or a passion for a subject like gemology, physical therapy, or even  computer programming  will keep you on a faster track.  No matter your profession, nothing tops enthusiasm combined with knowledge and salted with human kindness and generosity, such as we are blessed with on this forum.  Without those who have the  knowledge sharing happily, and frequently with great humor here, all of us would be much less well informed.   

Even for those like me who are just dilettantes in reference to the gem and jewelry industry, access to folks like we have here enrich our lives immeasurably.
Auntie Dammit :Heart: DBL!

Offline Diamondsbylauren

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Re: I've had it!! I wanna go to GIA :(
« Reply #24 on: January 24, 2012, 12:57:36 PM »

 Am doing all possible to learn as much as i can in this field. Who knows where it
will go. Am lucky enough to be able to attend the up coming february show in Miami
where there are tons and tons of Diamonds galore are there to be admired. Am happy
to simply be able to engage in the jewelry trade in some shape and manner. At this point
it is more just like a consultant in helping someone i know pick out jewelry items that
get sold in germany.

Was surprised to find out just how vigilant one has to be when dealing with those selling
diamonds etc. as not all are forthcoming about what they are selling at the diamond
exchanges. One simply cannot have to much knowledge, and with lab grown diamonds
and so many diamond treating procedures hitting the scene - it's important to be able to
be able to discern the differences or to have a place to come where you know things are
presented in an honest manner. It is always a learning experience. Had my first go round
in New York and it was an eye opener.

i Really wanted to go to GIA UNTIL i found out they don't really teach grading
colored diamonds ---- so am still out pursuing the best way to continue to
deepen knowledge. Onwards and upwards. Have been scouring the net to
see what is out there in the way of diamonds and DBL has consistently nice
pieces and inventory. Am immersing myself in as many ways possible in seeing
and learning about and sussing out as much as possible. One thing i did glean
recently was how they get the primary color in grading the diamonds as some
that are graded primary orange or pink base etc. at first glance appear to be
what is determined to be the secondary color. This was a really good thing to
learn. Am loving every moment of this.

Was also surprised to hear that GIA's courses are more geared to selling
jewelry in a store type of thing. Such a surprise.

 :heart2:





Just curious G- sounds like you've had your share of deceptive diamond dealers..... have you ever called us?
David
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