Author Topic: Jewelry Caring Tips  (Read 15282 times)

Offline zuccojerri

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Jewelry Caring Tips
« on: December 31, 2009, 06:07:18 AM »
Here is some basic information on caring for your jewelry.The most important thing you should do is to clean your jewelry. You can use Antibacterial soap and Water to thoroughly clean the jewelry. Do not use any kind of chemical to clean the jewelry or components due to the possibility of discoloration. Jewelry can be affected by ingested chemicals such as alcohol, mouthwash, cigarettes smoke, chlorine, soups,foods and/or drinks.

Offline oldmancoyote

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Re: Jewelry Caring Tips
« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2009, 10:16:21 AM »
Ummm - excuse me, but what exactly do you see as the difference between "chemicals" and antibacterial soap?

Offline Mikla

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Re: Jewelry Caring Tips
« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2009, 11:26:41 AM »
Not to create any undue controversy here, but text books define a chemical as any organic or inorganic substance of a particular molecular identity, which means that even plain water is a chemical, when you get right down to it.   Just :My2cents: !

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« Last Edit: December 31, 2009, 11:30:34 AM by Mikla »
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Offline Mrs Mitchell

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Re: Jewelry Caring Tips
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2009, 11:38:34 AM »
Should I stop with the ammonia? :)

Actually, that's a good point about cigarette smoke. When I smoked, my right earring and my rhr (cigarette hand) got a slight sticky coating.

Probably nothing compared with the coating my lungs were getting. I loved to smoke, so I did a lot of it. If I'm ever diagnosed with a terminal illness (or get to say, 85 or 90) I shall take it up again.
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Offline Mikla

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Re: Jewelry Caring Tips
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2009, 11:42:08 AM »
You always make me laugh, Jen!   ;)
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Offline Diamondsbylauren

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Re: Jewelry Caring Tips
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2009, 05:32:48 PM »
Does than mean I can't use this handy dandy sulfuric acid I have lying around?\
I've been soaking my Rolex in that for the past three days- I guess I should take it out.... >:D
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Offline Mrs Mitchell

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Re: Jewelry Caring Tips
« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2009, 05:42:43 PM »
Be careful of your fingers!  ;D
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Offline oldmancoyote

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Re: Jewelry Caring Tips
« Reply #7 on: December 31, 2009, 06:38:31 PM »
David, after three days you can take out anything that's left.

Offline joia

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Re: Jewelry Caring Tips
« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2010, 01:53:52 PM »
Stop please, I am laughing that much it hurts.
 ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D



Offline isabellabrown

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Re: Jewelry Caring Tips
« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2010, 02:22:41 AM »
This forum is really awesome it is really funny over here. Any ways, I have some tips to share with you people.

Gold comes in many styles and colors, but all gold jewelry will benefit from some tender, loving care!

    * Don't wear your gold jewelry while bathing or cleaning. Soap won't harm gold, but it will leave a filmy residue that will coat karat gold jewelry, causing it to appear less lustrous and dingy. If you prevent the film from forming, it will be easier to keep your jewelry beautiful and will reduce cleaning time and effort.

    * Avoid chlorine! Don't wear gold jewelry in the pool or hot tub or when using chlorine bleach or cleaners. Chlorine reacts with gold, particularly at high temperatures. Exposure to chlorine can permanently damage and discolor your gold jewelry.

    * Use a chamois cloth to clean gold jewelry. A chamois cloth is a gentle, safe material for returning the luster to your jewelry.

    * Avoid storing or otherwise exposing gold jewelry to hard, abrasive materials. Gold is a very soft metal, easily scratched even by rubbing against other jewelry.

Offline ah2bqat

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Re: Jewelry Caring Tips
« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2010, 02:15:03 AM »
...and that ain't nothin' compared to the care and feeding of platinum!  Or how to abuse it without even trying - just ask me.  I'm good to all my adopted cat babies - but rings?!?  They have to take a lot of abuse from me - but I still love them all.
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Offline oldmancoyote

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Re: Jewelry Caring Tips
« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2010, 05:37:01 AM »
Um - Isabella, I don't think gold is that much affected by chlorine. It's the other alloy metals (copper and silver in particular) that can give rise to pitting and discoloration, but even that is unlikely with many gold alloys and the chlorine amounts/concentrations that can be encountered in ordinary life.

Offline Mrs Mitchell

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Re: Jewelry Caring Tips
« Reply #12 on: March 30, 2010, 08:26:10 AM »
OMC, very true!

However, I do wonder what chlorine does to the rhodium plating on white gold? My earrings are all set in WG as it's  lighter weight than platinum and I wonder about that every time I swim. Any thoughts?

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Offline oldmancoyote

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Re: Jewelry Caring Tips
« Reply #13 on: March 30, 2010, 09:27:31 AM »
Rhodium is less reactive than gold, being only slightly attacked by aqua regia, which dissolves pure gold instead. Both are totally impervious to hydrochloric acid and sodium hypochlorite, or a pure chlorine atmosphere unless heated to at least 150 °C - at which point one tends to notice, and retire to safety rings and all (or stay there and cook in peace)

The big problems with the durability of a rhodium plating are is thickness (and its ability to "de-plate" electrochemically when exposed to certain environments - e.g. some skins' acidic pH) and the preparation of the substrate - if the underlying metal is not perfectly clean, it is quite easy for the plating to flake off.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2010, 09:41:40 AM by oldmancoyote »

Offline Mrs Mitchell

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Re: Jewelry Caring Tips
« Reply #14 on: March 30, 2010, 10:40:55 AM »
Thanks!

I think I have to face facts - it's my skin that makes white gold go yellow.

Not such a big deal with earrings, but my tennis bracelets are looking pretty grim.
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Offline annie1

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Re: Jewelry Caring Tips
« Reply #15 on: March 30, 2010, 12:34:02 PM »
Both are totally impervious to hydrochloric acid and sodium hypochlorite, or a pure chlorine atmosphere unless heated to at least 150 °C - at which point one tends to notice, and retire to safety rings and all (or stay there and cook in peace)

I'm thinking that if you're in a chlorine atmosphere that is heated to 150 °C, you probably have bigger worries than your jewelry.

Thanks for the quality info, OMC!
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Offline joia

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Re: Jewelry Caring Tips
« Reply #16 on: March 30, 2010, 01:22:33 PM »
This thread has always been a source of amusement for me, especially the sulphuric acid dip for a Rolex. 
But on a serious note, my white gold has to have rhodium plating done every year or so as it goes so yellow and my jeweller (not an oracle mind you) told me it is because of the different alloys used.  My older white gold jewellery stays white but some of my newer pieces go yellow much more quickly.
Who was it ages ago who told us Windex was marvellous for cleaning diamond jewellery, now a little tiny question "WHAT IS WINDEX?"

Offline annie1

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Re: Jewelry Caring Tips
« Reply #17 on: March 30, 2010, 01:56:52 PM »
Who was it ages ago who told us Windex was marvellous for cleaning diamond jewellery, now a little tiny question "WHAT IS WINDEX?"


It's a branded glass cleaner - basically household ammonia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windex
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Offline joia

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Re: Jewelry Caring Tips
« Reply #18 on: March 30, 2010, 04:07:43 PM »
Thanks Annie, I was really wondering about this.   Window cleaner coming up,
letīs  see if it makes my rings sparkle....
Cheaper than cognac at least.    ::)

Offline ah2bqat

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Re: Jewelry Caring Tips
« Reply #19 on: March 30, 2010, 06:02:04 PM »
They make a version that should be allowed to drip off chandeliers - that might work; but without polishing when still damp, normal windex still leaves a bit of residue.
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Offline WM

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Re: Jewelry Caring Tips
« Reply #20 on: March 30, 2010, 06:35:56 PM »
Still trying to determine if isabella is human or a bot.

Offline oldmancoyote

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Re: Jewelry Caring Tips
« Reply #21 on: March 31, 2010, 12:08:34 AM »
WM: I vote for a particular type of human.

Joia: the reason your older joias (;)) stay white is because older alloys are better ;D. Or they contain nickel, which is a very effective "bleaching" agent for gold, although it can cause allergies. Rhodium plating was introduced I think in the late '60s as a way to use cheaper and/or less allergenic gold alloys and make them look whiter. Some makers have always used more expensive palladium-based alloys throughout, and that would be my preference if I were to buy WG. But with gold and platinum at roughly the same price, why bother?
« Last Edit: March 31, 2010, 12:10:15 AM by oldmancoyote »

Offline joia

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Re: Jewelry Caring Tips
« Reply #22 on: March 31, 2010, 08:41:59 AM »
Well I am pleased to say I am not allergic to nickel, that is obvious.
I love platinum that  stays white forever but my pre-1920 is all silver with yellow gold backing, which causes a problem too, if you clean the dark looking silver you lose the patine so it stays that colour although that way it  keeps  its antique  value too, but I would prefer nice shiny platinum making my OECs look nicer.
I am just thinking of trying my window cleaner on my least loved diamonds first.
My unlucky eldest daughter gets sore ears from any jewellery, gold, white gold and silver, she still wears it though but suffers the next day.  What women will do for love (of jewellery).




Offline oldmancoyote

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Re: Jewelry Caring Tips
« Reply #23 on: March 31, 2010, 10:06:48 AM »
Joia - why do you think that cleaning the silver will alter the patina on it (or on the gold)?

Patina in metals is caused by microscopic scratches and pitting - unless you polished the pieces on a goldsmith polishing wheel, with ample supply of rouge, simply removing the tarnish (silver chloride/sulphide) layer won't do anything to the surface. Some low carat gold (14k or lower) from the first part of the 20th century develops an oxidation layer due to the copper in the alloy surfacing and becoming oxidised with a reddish/brownish colour. That will be removed when cleaning the silver - but as far as I know it's not prized or valued as attractive (if anything, the opposite).

Now, if you like it - as do the Japanese, who appreciate the glimmering beauty of black silver more than the brightness of the freshly polished metal - by any means keep it, but don't feel you are ruining the pieces by removing the tarnish.

Offline joia

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Re: Jewelry Caring Tips
« Reply #24 on: March 31, 2010, 02:27:23 PM »
Thanks OMC you are a jewel.   That said I must try cleaning my motherīs ring that I inherited, I dislike the black but have always been scared of ruining it.
Remember when I steam cleaned my very old earrings and a diamond flew out?  Luckily I found it. 
Most of my old pieces are high grade gold 800 which is the normal standard of gold in Portugal,  my art deco are 15ct, 18ct or platinum, no problem there.
Now, pretty please,  what do I use to clean the silver parts of the  Victorian jewellery? Windex?  LOL